Fifty percent of land is disputed—UHRC report

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The aim of the study was for the Government to gain a deeper understanding of the underlying issues behind land disputes and the related human rights implications.

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PIC: Meddie Kaggwa (third-right) the chairman of Uganda Human Rights Commission and other members during the launch of the report on land disputes and human rights in some selected regions of Uganda. Left is Dr. Zahara Nampewo, next is Hon. Gilbert Okanya and next to Kaggwa is Hon. Jova Kamateka. (Credit: Meddie Musisi)

LAND DISPUTES

REPORT- Almost half of land holders in Uganda are facing ownership related disputes, a new report by the Uganda Human Right Commission (UHRC), has revealed.

According to the report, which was released on Thursday at Golf Course Hotel, the disputes are orchestrated by family wrangles, land grabbing, forced evictions and unfair compensation by Government and investors.

“Fifty percent of land holders are affected by some sort of land disputes,” the research, which was conducted in 12 districts drawn from Karamoja, northern, eastern and central regions, noted.

Speaking at the launch of the report, Med Kaggwa, the chairperson of Uganda Human Rights Commission, said the aim of the study was for the Government to gain a deeper understanding of the underlying issues behind land disputes and the related human rights implications.

“The research comes at a time when land disputes have become a common occurrence in Uganda, with implications on the enjoyment of fundamental human rights and freedoms. It is important to note that land is not only one of the most important resources, but also a means to the realisation of other human rights such as the right to food, right to life and the right to cultural identity,” he said.

Kamadi Byonabye, the head of research at UHRC, said 465 respondents from districts of Mubende, Kayunga, Mpigi, Moroto, Napak, Nakapiripirit, Katakwi, Kween, Bududa, Amuru, Bulisa and Masindi, were interviewed for the research on land disputes.

According to the report, population increase, unclear district boundaries, corruption, increased infrastructure development projects, family disputes, forced evictions, inadequate compensation, land grabbing and weak land related institutions are some of the key drivers of land conflict in the country.

However, Dr. Zahara Nampewo, a lecturer of human rights law at Makerere University, said urbanisation, politicisation and militarisation of land are the major drivers of land conflict in the country.

Source: New Vision

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