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Busoga to swap sugarcane growing for animal husbandry

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Speaker of Parliament, Rebecca Kadaga launched a USD$43M (about sh160b) project which is tailored to addressing the underlying causes of poverty in Busoga.

 

BUSOGA – Hemmed in by Lakes Victoria and Kyoga, home to the source of the Nile, criss-crossed by many small rivers and swamps draining into the aforesaid lakes and blessed with fertile soils, one would expect Busoga sub region to be one of the richest in Uganda.

Instead, this region, home to over 3.5m people, has, according to Uganda National Bureau of Statics (UBOS), one of the highest proportions of people living below the poverty line only second to Karamoja and Bukedi.

Yesterday, Speaker of Parliament, Rebecca Kadaga launched a USD$43M (about sh160b) project which is tailored to addressing the underlying causes of poverty in Busoga which is as  surprising as its embarrassing for a region that has never been ravaged by war.

Dubbed the ‘revolutionizing livestock farming in the greater Busoga”, the five-year project is tailored to implementing an  ambitious paradigm shift among the Basoga from focusing on subsisting farming and sugarcane growing to high quality animal husbandry.

The launch was graced by the minister of finance, Matia Kasaija, the one of agriculture, Vicent Bamulangaki Ssempija , China’s ambassador to Uganda, H.E Zheng Zhuqiang, political leaders from Busoga and the top brass of National Animal Genetic Resource Center and Data Bank (NAGRIC&DB) led by its Executive Director, Dr. Charles Lagu.

“Poverty is resident in Busoga where 42% of the people live below the poverty line. This project will go a long way in addressing the underlying causes,” Kadaga said.

The project which has been developed under the auspices of ministry of agriculture will entail using Kasolwe Stock Ranch as a center of Excellency for learning, innovation and genetic improvement of animal breeds.

The project will be implemented by government ministries, agencies and departments most especially NAGRIC &DB.

According to Lagu, the scope of the project will include construction and operationalization of key infrastructure on Kasolwe ranch, revitalization of key water sources, provision of artificial insemination services and capacity building programs for staff and farmers.

Other components of the project will include establishment of a livestock input storage facilities, planting of superior pastures and trees,  provision of extension services, building hay bans and silage  for dry weather feeding of quality animals and fish cages construction.

With a revitalized Kasolwe, farmers in Busoga will have their local Zebu cattle implanted with embryos of high quality cattle both for milk and beef production as the campaign to haul majority of the people in the region gathers pace.

Studies by Government, Kasaija revealed, have proved that people engaged in animal husbandry have been able to get out of poverty faster than those solely relying on subsistence farming.

His Excellency Zheng Zhuqiang revealed that China is willing to provide market for beef, fish and poultry products from Uganda so long as they are of the requisite standards.

Poverty in Busoga

The issue of poverty in Busoga has for years remained a puzzle with some honchos in government blaming it on people in the region turning their land to sugarcane out growers.

The latest UBOS report indicates that Busoga is at the bottom of the pile in terms of poverty indicators.  Busoga has 45% of its people engaged in subsistence farming as compared to the national average of 42%.

The problem with the aforesaid revelation is that UBOS data indicates that between 2013 and 2016, poverty among the faming population increased from 23 to 36%.

Since 2009/10, UBOS indicates, poverty has fallen in all regions except the eastern region of which the 11 districts of Busoga are part.

-New Vision

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Smallholder Farmers Can Now Access Agricultural Credit Facility Without Collateral

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The Agricultural Credit Facility (ACF) has devised a path-breaking innovation of block allocation to enable farmers access loans based on alternative collateral such as chattel mortgages, cash flow based financing, and character-based loans, among others, Dr. Michael Atingi-Ego, Deputy Governor, Bank of Uganda, has revealed.

“This innovation is unlocking access to credit in areas with communal land tenure; and most especially, for micro and smallholder farmers who are otherwise excluded for lack of collateral to secure credit.

“By September 2020, the ACF had advanced UGX 2.8 billion to 187 small and micro borrowers with non-traditional collateral under block allocation,” he said.

The ACF is administered by the Bank of Uganda on behalf of the Government of Uganda.

The Deputy Governor said that through this innovation, the ACF working with the participating institutions, has extended loans of up to UGX 20 million to small-scale farmers.

He further said that block allocations support financial inclusion and advance equity in economic activity by serving women and youths with limited property rights.

Dr. Atingi-Ego made the remarks just before he a launched the 2020 Agricultural Finance Yearbook at Imperial Royal Hotel, Kampala on Tuesday.

The Agricultural Finance Yearbook  has produced by the Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC) since 2014/15.

The yearbook contains several agri-financing models for various commodities such as rice, dairy, coffee, among others. The models have some standard features:aggregation of producers for economies of scale, functional linkages between value chain actors (input distributors, extension agents, agri-markets information providers, producers, storage units, marketing agents, processors, financial service providers, wherein some players are ‘lead agents’ in the segments where value chains are weak.

The Ugandan economy is still heavily reliant on agriculture, with 69 percent of households dependent on subsistence farming and nearly 75 percent of all households.

Atingi-Ego  revealed that the share of value-added by the agriculture sector in the economy stands at about 25 percent, presently.

“Boldly facing these facts, it is clear that whenever the BoU announces the Central Bank Rate (CBR), the intended policy signal may not penetrate through to the majority of the population. It is, also, quite evident that the route for the CBR signals to reach the people will be unblocked through agricultural finance,” Atingi-Ego said.

He added: “Fortunately, by seeking to close the information gap between agriculture and finance, these yearbooks bring much-needed illumination to the recesses of information asymmetry, thereby improving risk analysis and credit scoring of agricultural credit.”

 

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Uganda’s coffee exports on the rise

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The Uganda Coffee Development Authority (UCDA) says that the country’s coffee exports are increasing, showing a gradual rise in the last two years.

“Coffee exports for Sep 2019 to Oct 2020 totalled to 5,409,054 bags worth $513.99m compared to 4,465,534 bags worth $435.81m the previous year,” UCDA noted in a tweet on Wednesday.

“This is a 20% and 18% increase in quantity and value. Performance attributed to increase in production, fruitation of new coffee trees and good weather,” the authority added.

In the last one year (since June 2019), the highest earnings from coffee exports of $48.2m were registered in January 2020 followed by the August 2019 earnings of $46.3m.

More so, Uganda’s coffee was ranked third best in the world by cup tasters who graded 1,229 coffees from around the world.

According to the Research Gate, studies show that Uganda is one of the largest producing and exporting countries of coffee products in the world.

Coffee production has heavily contributed to both domestic and foreign earnings in the country.

Moreover, coffee also serves as a primary source of labour, especially for the rural smallholder farmers.

Original Post: New Vision

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Agriculture rebounds as economy recovers

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Prices of agricultural products are starting to rebound as the easing of lockdown measures in Uganda open up places of food consumption.

Evans Nakhokho, the chief manager, Agribusiness at Centenary bank, said during a thought-leadership forum hosted by the bank that economic recovery interventions had triggered a five per cent increase in food prices.

“The five percentage point price improvement is largely attributed to the gradual recovery of activities in the agricultural sector and the economy as a whole. A case in point is the improved price of matoke and other foodstuffs,” Nakhokho said.

Key to this recovery is the role that has been played by both financial and non-financial services in helping to ease the access of credit to framers, which, according to Nakhokho, raised the fortunes in the sector.

“Financing plays an instrumental role in boosting agricultural activities. The structured ecosystem that focuses on both financial and non-financial services has enabled the utilization of credit. This year, we have disbursed close to Shs 600 billion, of which 60 per cent has been issued to smallholder farmers.”

The symbiotic relationship shared by the banking sector and agriculture means that both have been pivotal to each other’s recovery efforts, according to Nakhokho.

“Agriculture financing contributes about 12 per cent of the total lending to all sectors in the banking industry, which is approximately Shs 2 trillion,” he said.

Beyond the financing, banks have also offered guidance to their customers in relation to managing their credit and how it can be invested for a strong return on investment, according to Nakhokho. He said they had reviewed business projects and even restructured the loans to make it easier for customers to pay back the money.

LESSONS

Mona Ssebuliba, chief operating officer, Agricultural Business Initiative (aBi), said their focus as an organization has been on stabilizing and strengthening financial institutions to ensure that agribusiness financing is supported.

“This has been implemented by rescheduling lines of credit (principal and interest) for a period of 12 months, reduced interest rate from an average of 13.5 per cent to 8.2 per cent on all running facilities…”

Ssebuliba said. Ssebuliba said farmers have to improve their businesses if they are to survive other challenges. He advised commercial farmers to have “the ability to swiftly adapt to improved business models, digitizing for improved resilience, business monitoring, and putting in place business continuity plans for the unexpected occurrences…”

ASSESSING COVID IMPACT

Martin Fowler, the agriculture adviser, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Uganda, recently stated that the Covid-19 lockdown presented mixed results in the prices of food. According to Fowler, there was a slight spike in staple food prices between March and April, followed by a slight decline, though, to August.

“Maize prices rose rapidly in the early weeks of Covid-19 lockdown (mid- March to April) from Shs 1,129 to Shs 1,458 per kg. This trend was caused by a combination of panic buying, speculation, government purchases and supply-chain disruptions. Other staples mirrored this trend,” Fowler said.

According to Fowler, food prices currently remain close to (significantly above, in the case of beans) 2019 levels and the five-year (2015-2019) averages, which shows that the sector has for the meantime managed to weather the storm from the impact of Covid-19 on the agricultural sector.

Effecting of the lockdown by the government, therefore, led to a decline in effective demand for food, which reduced household incomes, according to USAID.

Agriculture experts have now projected that the significant loss of formal sector jobs and incomes as a result of the impact of Covid-19 will continue to impact negatively the domestic demand for food, and their prices on the market. Similarly, international and regional demand prospects for agricultural commodities remain uncertain despite the improvement in food prices.

Original Post: The Observer

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